Technical Papers

Fabrication

Wednesday, 13 August 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM | Vancouver Convention Centre, East Building, Exhibit Hall A Session Chair: Bernhard Thomaszewski, Disney Research Zürich

An Asymptotic Numerical Method for Inverse Elastic Shape Design

This asymptotic numerical method for inverse elastic shape design runs orders of magnitude faster than traditional Newton-type methods and can be used to compute the rest shape of an elastic object so that after fabrication it deforms into a desired shape in the physical world.

Xiang Chen
Zhejiang University

Changxi Zheng
Columbia University

Weiwei Xu
Hangzhou Normal University

Kun Zhou
Zhejiang University

Spin-It: Optimizing Moment of Inertia for Spinnable Objects

This method generates designs for spinning objects by optimizing rotational dynamics. Given a shape, it modifies the mass distribution for the desired moment of inertia by creating inner voids, incorporating deformation and also multiple materials. The resulting tops and yo-yos are 3D printed, and they spin stably despite their asymmetric exterior.

Moritz Bächer
Disney Research Zürich

Emily Whiting
ETH Zürich

Bernd Bickel
Disney Research Zürich

Olga Sorkine-Hornung
ETH Zürich

Build-to-Last: Strength to Weight 3D Printed Objects

This new 3D printing scheme reduces the material cost of a given object while printing a durable model resistant to impact and external forces by leveraging honeycomb structure. The method employs an adaptive centroidal Voronoi volumetric tessellation and harmonic carving to maximize the strength-to-weight ratio.

Lin Lu
Shandong University

Andrei Sharf
Ben-Gurion University

Haisen Zhao
Shandong University

Yuan Wei
Shandong University

Qingnan Fan
Shandong University

Xuelin Chen
Shandong University

Yann Savoye
Ben-Gurion University

Changhe Tu
Shandong University

Daniel Cohen-Or
Tel Aviv University

Baoquan Chen
Shandong University

Bridging the Gap: Automated Steady Scaffoldings for 3D Printing

A novel approach to generate scaffoldings that supports printing on plastic-filament printers. The technique exploits the ability of plastic-filament printers to deposit plastic accross gaps. It generates scaffoldings that support overhangs and increase part stability during the print process. The scaffoldings use few materials but remain reliable to print.

Jérémie Dumas
Université de Lorraine, INRIA

Jean Hergel
INRIA, Université de Lorraine

Sylvain Lefebvre
INRIA, Université de Lorraine

Computational Light Routing: 3D Printed Optical Fibers for Sensing and Display

Using 3D printing to create objects with embedded optical fibers for applications in sensing and display, and introducing a fiber-routing algorithm that automatically maximizes light transmission while respecting manufacturing constraints.

Thiago Pereira
Princeton University

Wojciech Matusik
CSAIL MIT

Szymon Rusinkiewicz
Princeton University