Technical Papers

Mesh-Based Simulation

Wednesday, 13 August 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM | Vancouver Convention Centre, East Building, Ballroom A Session Chair: Paul Kry, McGill University

Animation of Deformable Bodies with Quadratic Bézier Finite Elements

This investigation of the use of quadratic finite elements for animation of deformable bodies considers both integrating quadratic elements with linear elements and simulation of non-linear rest shapes.

Adam Bargteil
University of Utah

Elaine Cohen
University of Utah

Adaptive Tearing and Cracking of Thin Sheets

In this method for adaptive fracture propagation in thin sheets, local projective remeshing and a sub-stepping fracture scheme allow fine resolution of fracture dynamics, and simulation of materials with very different fracture behaviors in a realistic manner.

Tobias Pfaff
University of California, Berkeley

Rahul Narain
University of California, Berkeley

Juan Miguel de Joya
University of California, Berkeley

James O' Brien
University of California, Berkeley

Codimensional Surface Tension Flow on Simplicial Complexes

A novel method for simulating codimensional surface-tension-driven phenomena on simplicial complexes. The method models fluid features (volumes, thin films, filaments, and droplets) in different codimensions and solves incompressible flow with surface tension in those codimensions in a unified way.

Bo Zhu
Stanford University

Ed Quigley
Stanford University

Matthew Cong
Stanford University

Justin Solomon
Stanford University

Ronald Fedkiw
Stanford University

Multimaterial Mesh-Based Surface Tracking

This paper presents a robust collision-safe surface-tracking method for the evolution of complex multimaterial interfaces in 3D using labeled non-manifold triangle meshes. The method includes novel strategies for merging colliding geometry and handling the T1 and T2 topological operations that arise only for multiple materials.

Fang Da
Columbia University

Christopher Batty
University of Waterloo

Eitan Grinspun
Columbia University

Physics-Inspired Adaptive Fracture Refinement

This paper proposes a physics-inspired approach to enrich coarse fracture animation by realistic fracture details. Given a custom-designed material strength field, the method uses a gradient flow to adaptively refine a coarse fracture surface into a detailed one. This approach is simple, fast, and friendly to user control.

Zhili Chen
The Ohio State University

Miaojun Yao
The Ohio State University

Renguo Feng
The Ohio State University

Huamin Wang
The Ohio State University